© 2016 - Saints Peter and Paul Orthodox Church    602-253-9515                    All rights reserved.

Links

Bookstore

About Us

Ministries

Home

Photos

Saints Peter and Paul Orthodox Church

1614 E Monte Vista Road

Phoenix, Arizona 85006

602-253-9515

Regular Services

Saturday:  

 5:00 PM  Great Vespers

Sunday:

 9:00 AM  Divine Liturgy


The Right Reverend DANIEL, Bishop of Santa Rosa, Rector


Priest David Balmer, Attached, Retired


Protodeacon

Alexis Washington

Biography

By sharing in the ways of the Apostles, you became a successor to their throne. Through the practice of virtue, you found the way to divine contemplation, O inspired one of God; by teaching the word of truth without error, you defended the Faith, even to the shedding of your blood. Hieromartyr Babylas, entreat Christ God to save our souls.

You guarded the mighty works of faith in your heart, therefore, you did not fear the tyrant; preserve us as well, Hieromartyr Babylas, good servant of Christ.

Church Etiquette

Click for Directions to our Church

August

Newsletter & Calendar

Today’s Saint

Fasting Seasons

of the

Church

Daily Prayers

Morning Prayers

Evening Prayers

Prayer to The

Theotokos

Love Without Limits

Today’s Scripture Readings

Reflections in Christ

Parish Contacts


Bishop Daniel, Rector

bishopdaniel@sspeterpaulaz.org

480-287-0240

Father David Balmer, Attached, Retired

frdavidb@sspeterpaulaz.org

480-213-7631

Protodeacon Alexis Washington

pdnalexis@sspeterpaulaz.org

Stephanie A. Homyak, Church School Director & Newsletter Editor

stephanie@sspeterpaulaz.org

623-869-0470

Barbara Peterson, Myrrh Bearers

barbara@sspeterpaulaz.org

602-278-1994

Andrew Evans, Council President

andy@sspeterpaulaz.org

480-948-7929

Pat Starkey, FOCA President

pabs5@cox.net

623-512-2021

Barbara Harp, Choir Director

bharp@vosymca.org

Mike Wagner, Webmaster   

mike@sspeterpaulaz.org

602-741-4950

Orthodox Church in America Links

Orthodox Church In America

Diocese of the West

Diocese of the Midwest

Diocese of New England

Diocese of the South

Diocese of

New York & New Jersey

Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania

Diocese of Alaska

Archdiocese of Canada

Exarchate of Mexico

Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America

Orthodox Sites

to Visit

OCA.org

DOWOCA.org

Youth & Young Adults

pravmir.com

pravoslavie.ru

Mospat.ru/en

patriarchia.ru/

Occasional Orthodox Prayers and Creeds

Newsletter

Archive

Aug 2016

Jul 2016

Jun 2016

May 2016

Apr 2016

Mar 2016

Feb 2016

Jan 2016

Dec 2015

Nov 2015

Oct 2015

Aug 2015

Jul 2015

Jun 2015

May 2015

Apr 2015

Mar 2015

Feb 2015

Jan 2015

Dec 2014

Nov 2014

Oct 2014

Sep 2014

Aug 2014

July 2014

May 2014

Apr 2014

Mar 2014

Jan/Feb 2014

Dec 2013

Nov 2013

Oct 2013

Sep 2013

Aug 2013

Jul 2013

May 2013

Apr 2013

Mar 2013

Jan 2013

Dec 2012

Nov 2012

Sep 2012

Aug 2012

Jul 2012

Jun 2012

May 2012

Apr 2012

Mar 2012

Feb 2012

Jan 2012

Dec 2011

Nov 2011

Oct 2011

Sep 2011

Jul 2011

Local

Orthodox Churches

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral

Assumption Greek Orthodox Church

St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church

St. Haralambos Greek Orthodox Church

St. Katherine Greek Orthodox Church

St. John the Evangelist

St. John the Baptist Romanian Orthodox Church

Exaltation of The Holy Cross Orthodox Church

St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church

Site Quarterly Reports

2nd Qtr 2016

1st Qtr 2016

4th Qtr 2015

3rd Qtr 2015

2nd Qtr 2015

1st Qtr 2015

4th Qtr 2014

3rd Qtr 2014

2nd Qtr 2014

1st Qtr 2014

4th Qtr 2013

3rd Qtr 2013


Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,


The month of August brings with it several beautiful feasts, among them the Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord (August 6) and the Feast of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos (August 15).  This month also heralds the time of transition from the days of vacations, catching up of overdue projects, and other summer activities to what we might refer to as the “regular” time of the year as students return to class and our focus returns to more commonplace and routine activities.

I think that this time of the year also provides us with a wonderful opportunity for reflection—it serves as a bridge to reflect upon how we spent the summer and how we plan to spend the school year ahead of us.  And to reflect on bigger, possibly more profound aspects of our lives.  As an example, I invite you to reflect upon how you view our parish community as well as your place within it.  We are grateful for and understand the responsibilities and blessings that are ours in the life we strive to live as Orthodox Christians.  But I wonder how often we reflect upon the fact that our Orthodox Christian life is lived not only as members of the Orthodox Church but even more specifically as members of the Eucharistic community that gathers in prayer, worship, fellowship, and service at Saints Peter and Paul Orthodox Church.

When I think of our parish community, these are a few of the thoughts that come to mind: we are prayerful, dedicated to worship, always seeking to be hospitable, desiring to serve, always growing, changing and remaining the same, looking to the future and grateful for the past, celebrating what we have received, building upon the strong foundation that has been given us, seeking new avenues of service, reaching out to the community around us, supportive of all aspects of our life together, creating an oasis of faith in the midst of the city, enjoying old friendships and establishing new ones, wanting to share with others the beauty and boldness of our faith, dedicated to our social life and fellowship, always willing to open our doors to our neighbors….  And the list continues on and on.

I’m sure that you can arrive at many more thoughts- and many more original thoughts-  about our parish community and your place within it.  Everyone is unique and everyone has his or her unique place in our parish.  However anyone understands this, and as different as each person’s thoughts, reflections, and understandings might be, I am confident that there is one common element, one common theme: we are all grateful that the Lord has brought us together in this family of faith.

As we soon turn the corner and enter back into our more “regular” schedule, I look forward to continuing our life together in this blessed parish. And I am grateful for the part that each one of you plays in it.


With love in the Lord,

+Bishop Daniel


 Bishop Daniel’s Message for August

Visit our local Monasteries  websites

Saint John of San Francisco Monastery

Monastery of Saint Anthony the Great

Saint Paisius Monastery



Building Hope

for Boys Without

Families

And Families

Without Homes

Martyr Gorazd of Prague, Bohemia and Moravo-Cilezsk

Our father among the saints Bishop Gorazd (Pavlik) of Prague was the hierarch of the revived Orthodox Church in Moravia, the Church of Czechoslovakia, after World War I. During World War II, having provided refuge for the assassins of SS-Obergruppenfuher Reinhard Heydrich, called The Butcher of Prague, in the cathedral of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Prague, St. Gorazd took full responsibility for protecting the patriots after the Nazi overlords found them in the crypt of the cathedral. This act guaranteed his execution, thus his martyrdom, during the reprisals that followed.


Hieromartyr Babylas the Bishop of Antioch


The Hieromartyr Babylas and with him the three youths Urban, Prilidian, Epolonius and their mother Christodoula died as martyrs under the emperor Decius (249-251). During his stay in their city of Antioch, the emperor arranged for a large festival in honor of the pagan gods.

At the same time, Babylas, the holy and God-fearing Bishop of Antioch, was serving the Divine Liturgy in church. He prayed for his flock and taught them to endure all tribulations for Christ with courage. The idolater Decius, curious to witness the Divine Mysteries, decided to enter the church.


News of this reached the bishop, so he went out to meet Decius and blocked the path to the church, for he was unwilling to permit impiety in the temple of God. When the emperor approached the church doors, St Babylas refused to let him enter, so the emperor had to abandon his intention. He wanted to take revenge on the saint right away, but when he saw the large throng of Christians, he feared they might riot.


The next day the angry emperor ordered that the church be set on fire, and for Bishop Babylas to be brought before him. When asked why he had insulted the imperial dignity by not allowing the emperor to enter the church, the holy bishop answered, “Anyone who would rise up against God and want to desecrate His sanctuary, is not worthy of respect, but has become the enemy of the Lord.”


Decius declared that the holy bishop must worship the idols in order to make up for his lack of respect for the emperor, or else face execution. After convincing himself that the martyr would remain steadfast in his faith, he commanded the military commander Victorinus to put him in heavy chains and lead him through the city in disgrace. The holy martyr replied, “Emperor, these chains are as venerable for me as your imperial crown is for you. For me, suffering for Christ is as desirable as the imperial power is for you. Death for the Immortal King is as precious to me as your life is to you.”


At the trial with Bishop Babylas were three young brothers, who did not forsake him even in this most difficult moment. Seeing them, the emperor asked, “Who are these children? “


“These are my spiritual children,” the saint replied, “and I have raised them in piety, I have given them an education, cultivated them with guidance, and here before you in a small body are these great young men and perfect Christians. Test them and see.”


The emperor tried in all sorts of ways to entice the youths and their mother Christodoula to renounce Christ, but in vain. Then, in a rage, he ordered each of them to be whipped with a number of blows corresponding to their age. The first received twelve blows, the second, ten, and the third, seven. Dismissing the mother and children, the torturer again summoned the bishop, telling him that the children had renounced Christ. He did not believe the lie, however.


Then he commanded all the martyrs be tied to a tree and burned with fire. Seeing the stoic bravery of the saints, the emperor finally condemned them to be beheaded with the sword.


Martyr Urban


Saint Urban suffered martyrdom with his brothers Epolonius and Prilidian, their mother Christodoula, and the hieromartyr Babylas in the reign of the emperor Decius (249-251).

The three young brothers were put on trial with Bishop Babylas, remaining with him even in this difficult moment. Seeing them, the emperor asked, “Who are these children? “

“These are my spiritual children,” the saint replied, “and I have raised them in piety, I have given them an education, cultivated them with guidance, and here in a small body before you are these great young men and perfect Christians. Test them and see.”

The emperor tried in all sorts of ways to entice the youths and their mother Christodoula to renounce Christ, but in vain. Then, in a rage, he ordered each of them to be whipped with a number of blows corresponding to their age. The first received twelve blows, the second, ten, and the third, seven. Dismissing the mother and children, the torturer again summoned the bishop, telling him that the children had renounced Christ. He did not believe this lie, however.

Then he commanded all the martyrs be tied to a tree and burned with fire. Seeing the stoic bravery of the saints, the emperor finally condemned them to be beheaded with the sword.










The Most Blessed TIKHON
Archbishop of Washington
Metropolitan of All America and Canada


Biography








The Most Reverend BENJAMIN
Archbishop of San Francisco and the Diocese of the West


Biography

Definitions and Sources


a. The English words vespers and matins come from the Latin words for evening and morning, respectively. Likewise, the names for these two services in other Orthodox liturgical languages (Greek and Church Slavonic, among them) are essentially the words for the same two times of the day in those languages, and by extension the names for the services celebrated at those times. In the Greek language orthros is the word for the morning service, as well as for the early morning, and it is often used in English as well as a name for the morning service, also called matins. The words vespers and matins are, strictly speaking, plural nouns but are often construed as singular; in these pages they have been used both ways, but most often as singular.


b. A liturgical day includes the cycle of services beginning with vespers in the evening and ending with the 9th hour the following afternoon. Thus when we speak of services for Sunday, or the Resurrection service, we begin with vespers, which is served Saturday evening. Similarly, vespers for the 25th of the month will be served on the evening of the 24th, and the Wednesday services begin on Tuesday evening. (As regards rubrical instructions vespers is counted as belonging to the new day, although the change from one day to the next actually takes place during the course of vespers.)


c. “Current tone” means of the tone of the week, that is, the tone of the Octoechos that is currently in use.


d. “Of the saint” vs. “Of the day”: The expressions “of the saint” and “of the saint of the day” mean the saint (or the icon, or other fixed feast) being commemorated that calendar date (for example, the saint for September 26, if that is the current date). Any reference to “saint” means the hymn can be found in the menaion. Thus “troparion of the saint” and “troparion from the menaion” are equivalent expressions. On the other hand, the expressions “of the day,” “for the day,” etc. mean of the day of the week (Monday, Tuesday, etc.), often the current or present day of the week. Thus, “troparion of the day” means, on Monday, the troparion of the Bodiless Hosts; on Tuesday, the troparion of St. John the Baptist; on Wednesday, the troparion of the Cross; on Thursday, of the Apostles and St. Nicholas; on Friday, the Cross again; on Saturday, the departed and all saints.


e. “Resurrectional” and “Sunday” are equivalent; thus “Sunday Troparion” and “Resurrectional Troparion” and “Troparion of the Resurrection” are equivalent expressions. “Resurrection” means “taken from the service of the Resurrection in the Tone of the Week.”


f. Sticheron (pl. stichera) is the name for the short hymns often sung during the services, for example at Lord, I call, at the Aposticha, and at the Praises and elsewhere. Likewise a “verse” refers to the short psalm verses sung between the stichera at the Aposticha (these are called pripevy in Church Slavonic and stoichoi in Greek).


g. “glory:” means “Glory to the Father . . . Spirit” and “now:” means “now and ever . . . Amen.” “glory and now:” means “Glory to the Father . . . Amen.”


h. “Glory verse,” “Glory” and “Doxastichos” mean a hymn (usually to a saint) that is sung after “Glory to the Father ...” but before “Now and ever ...” The expressions “The saint has a glory,” “there is a glory,” “glory for the saint (if there is one)” etc. refer to such a hymn. When there is “no glory,” this means that there is no such hymn prescribed and therefore we sing “Glory to the Father . . . Spirit” followed immediately by “now and ever . . . Amen.” with no intervening hymn (and this is what is denoted by “glory and now:”)


i. A “lesser saint” (sometimes called a “minor” or “small” saint) is not, of course, a saint who is less important, but rather one whose celebration is smaller or less than other ranks of saints.


j. “Temple.” Following the terminology of Orthodox service books and rubrics books, “church” refers to the community of the faithful, which is also called the Body of Christ, the Bride of Christ, the New Israel, the People of God, and other titles; while “temple”—as in the Jewish faith from which our worship developed—refers to the building in which the Church worships. In Christ’s own risen Body the two concepts are joined, since his resurrected body is called a “temple” (John 2:21) and it also constitutes the Church which is the Body of Christ.


k. “Patronal feast” of a temple is the celebration honoring the feast or saint in whose name the temple is dedicated. “Temple saint” or “saint of the temple” is the patron saint of a temple which bears the name of a saint. Usually a “temple saint” is accorded the same rank of liturgical celebration as a “vigil saint,” that is, a saint having a vigil.

Sources


The chief sources of the information contained in these tables are: Typikon (Moskva, 1896); TSerkovnyi bogosluzhebnyi ustav v tablitsakh na vsie dni goda, sostavlennyi A. Neapolitanskim (Montreal’, Kanada : 1986), a photographic reprint of a work originally published in 1899 with the title: TSerkovnyi ustav v tablitsakh, pokazyvaiushchii ves’ poriadok tserkovnykh sluzhb riadovykh i vsie osobennosti prazdnichnykh sluzhb v techenii vremeni goda. Also consulted: Oktoikh, (Moscow: 1906); Mineia mesiachnaia (Moskva : v Sinodal’noi tip, ca. 1890); The Order for Divine Services (also titled: Liturgical calendar and rubrics (South Canaan: St. Tikhon’s Monastery). Comments, corrections, suggestions, etc. may be forwarded to: music@oca.org.